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What-Are-You-Doing-with-Play

Page history last edited by rcole 15 years, 4 months ago

What Are You Doing with Play?

 

Let's Play Make BelieveThis is the place for workshop participants to post messages about their involvement with play- and game-based learning.  If you have time before the start of the workshop, use the entry forms below to share your experiences, insights, questions, and challenges.  After the ten minute break, you will have a chance to tell the group about your experiences and we will add entries to this page.  This will help kick-start your informal discussions and networking during the refreshment break.

 

1. [Mark]

Institution: University of Waterloo

Play/Game/Learning Experience: Encouraging instructors that it is OK to use humor

Tips/Insights:

Open Questions and Unresolved Challenges:

 

2. [Bob Cole]

Institution: Monterey Institute of International Studies

Play/Game/Learning Experience: Taking a playful approach to learning and faculty development 

Tips/Insights: Wii; Sandbox exerperience; informal time for faculty to come; exploring the controversy of play versus learning; collaboration tool -  Yammer

Open Questions and Unresolved Challenges:

 

3. [Chris Clark]

Institution:Notre Dame

Play/Game/Learning Experience: Exploring Second Life; make class more studio based; more active

Tips/Insights:

Open Questions and Unresolved Challenges:

 

4. [Kristin]

Institution: University of Oregon

Play/Game/Learning Experience: Arts/Visual course; exploring virtual campus to find resources

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Open Questions and Unresolved Challenges:

 

5. [Type Your Name Here]

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6. [Type Your Name Here]

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Comments (2)

wikiuser0004 said

at 10:32 am on Jan 20, 2009

This is zach whalen, U Mary Washington.

I teach New Media classes in the English Dept., so I teach more about play and games than with play or games. So games for me are often more the text than a tool.

But I teach a lot with ARGs, and what I've found is that it's hard to convey through lecture what an ARG is and how it works. So I have student groups research, play, and report on currently-running ARGs. Even the exhaustive cloudmaker archives don't quite get to the experience of playing the Beast, so I have students play contemporary games -- even if they are relatively mediocre or even non-starters (both situations make for good conversation points, anyway).

Then, I have the groups design their own mini-ARGs and then play each others'. All kinds of learning takes place along the way, and the process is fairly non-technical. That is, students find they have to effectively use the rhetoric of their chosen media to motivate make-belief (play) in their target audiences (each other). So it's been interesting.

wikiuser0004 said

at 10:35 am on Jan 20, 2009

Also, I'm teaching my class today using a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOO">MOO environment</a> that I built as a model of the building where we normally meet for class. So that's playful, I think.

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